•       Depression – Assessment is the important first piece to understanding what’s going on and to creating a plan for that individual. That’s why we work with the family and the client to determine what’s at the heart of the issue. Getting to the root cause and making sure that family and client are on the same page is critical. Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) work well for depression.
  •       Anxiety – The aim in treating anxiety is helping clients integrate the skills that will help them relax and calm themselves in the moment. Meditation and deep breathing techniques are very useful, along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT).
  •       Self-harm – For this treatment, it really depends on why the client is engaging in self-harming behaviors. As always, we assess to see what the underlying issue is and work from there. We help the client build alternative skills they can adapt to use in the moment. Dialectical behavioral treatment (DBT) works well.
  •       Suicidal ideation (SI) – This symptom may come from a lot of different sources. We’re always careful to do—as a first step—a full assessment that will get to the root of the SI. The understanding we gain helps us identify and develop an appropriate treatment plan on an individual basis. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is often a good choice for addressing SI.
  •       Aggression – While we are not designed to support physical aggression in treatment, we do accept clients with a history of aggression in the family. Typical treatment options include anger management, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and a focus on communication skills.
  •       Mood disorders – The treatment of mood disorders requires that we assess the client and come up with an individualized plan. We want to make sure we are addressing the specific needs of each client. Treatment likely involves the use of clinical behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), relationship and communication skills, and self-esteem groups.
  •       School refusal – Oftentimes, we put a level system in place that involves some rewards when school is completed. However, more often than not, there’s an underlying issue that has led to school refusal in the first place. Once that obstacle is identified, we can focus on addressing this issue directly. With treatment, the refusal can be lessened or eliminated. Fostering a structured environment in treatment also works well.
  •       Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) – Focusing on the family system is a key component to resolving RAD. To do this, we work to improve relationships and communication skills. Along with these therapies, dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) works well.
  •       Substance abuse – To treat a substance abuse issue, it is critical to do an assessment and determine the primary reason for substance use. That’s why we work with clients to uncover the underlying issues and develop a plan for addressing what’s really going on. In addition, we introduce the 12-step program, providing support via off-site meetings and work in-house.
  •       Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) – Our program is not structured to support ODD as a sole diagnosis. However, we are equipped to address ODD as a secondary concern along with a separate primary condition. To address ODD, we implement behavioral modification techniques as much as possible, and we provide a structured environment.